The Reading Room: Selection #2 (July 2018)


#1

New month, new book! This month is Michael Bamberger’s ‘Men in Green.’

Thank you all for your interest, participation and feedback. This is really cool and I hope we can keep it rolling.


#2

#3

Just finished this a couple weeks ago. Excellent choice.


#4

Excellent, read this two summers ago. Will pick it up again for a little refresher.


#5

Great read. Really enjoyed the chapter on Mickey Wright.


#6

Just finished. Great choice.


#7

This is probably my least favorite golf-related book after Chasing Tiger. It was a Michael Bamburger travel diary I never wanted and a hit piece on Ken Venturi that I never asked for (even if he did earn it). The entire time I was reading it I was baffled as to the point of its existence. It’s navel gazing into a terribly uninteresting navel.

The Dolphus Hull section was great though.

(love this reading room idea!)


#8

Got 8 pages in…at the point where he is making this list of living legends. He leaves out Tiger Woods. Doesn’t acknowledge why either, just leaves him out and instead adds Mickey Wright!

I don’t think I like this author. I kept reading because I wanted to give it more of an effort than 8 pages, but then he goes on this series of rambling, incoherent stories of Arnold Palmer. I love stories about Arnold, and it’s hard to tell a bad one, but he does, several times. I can’t get myself to keep reading it so I think I’ll take a break for a while, unless others out there who have read the whole thing can tell me it gets better.

Sorry for the negative post. Randy, I hope you do not consider me a bad person for not liking it, but that’s just my opinion thus far. I too love this reading room idea, and I LOVED the first book (and podcast).


#9

I think he says he made the list many years before he wrote the book. This would have made it before Tiger was a Legend. I find the Mickey Wright stuff intriguing. Hogan loved Wright’s swing. She remains more a mystery than Hogan himself.

I thought the Arnold Plamer stories were interesting because they weren’t there to merely make him seem like a saint. It painted a more realistic picture of him.


#10

Ahh I see. Must have missed that part. All right, I forgive him.